Mindculture for Kids and Adults – New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults - My New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults – My New Facebook Page

Dear All, I started a new Facebook page, Mindculture for Kids and Adults.

Your mind is your greatest asset.
This page is dedicated to sharing info on the art and science of mind culture from cradle to grave.

If your focus in self improvement is business oriented, you may also want to visit my Business Trainer Sri Lanka Facebook page.

Please visit, like and follow. And share the good news with your friends and family.

Thanks

Nilooka

 

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Smart Kids Found to Undergo Delayed Brain Development

imagesG62MJJET source-playroomdotcodotua

“Brainy children are not cleverer solely by virtue of having more or less gray matter at any one age,” says Judith Rapoport of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, Md. “Rather, IQ is related to the dynamics of cortex maturation.”

This is not a recent article as it dates back to 2006. But just give it a read anyway if you want to know how brains of smart kids work.

The full link: Smart Kids Found to Undergo Delayed Brain Development.

Neuroscientists and psychologists find links between handwriting and learning (NYT article)

Image

Have you entirely given up on handwriting? Do you still believe it helps you organize your thoughts even if you work on a computer to put together a document? Well, you may be right.

Here’s what a New York Times science article, What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades, says:

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain.

“And it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn’t realize,” he continued. “Learning is made easier.”

You can read the complete article at the above link.

Here are a few more links you’d find interesting:

Please don’t let your kids give up on cursive altogether. And try writing something yourself, especially if it has to do with learning important things.

What are your character strengths?

24CharacterStrengths image source-viacharacterblogdotorg

Shown above in visual format are what researchers in the field of positive psychology call character strengths. There are 24 and each of us have many of these to some degree. What are yours?

There are online tests to see where you stand on each one. How far or lower they are ranked.

Here’s one link (for which you must register, but its free):

I am nearing the end of a Coursera online course by the RELAY Graduate School of Education. While the  course is about Teaching Character and Creating Positive Class Rooms the course content is very useful for everyone. Many of us participants are benefiting personally in terms of figuring out our real character strengths and also weak areas.

The discussion forums are brimming with great ideas on how to use this info with kids in classrooms, outside, and at home.

Even though it may be too late to take part in the course, you may want to check out the videos and understand the concepts. There are lots of resources for you to check out as well. The course ends in a week or so.

But you can download the content for future reference provided you register in the course. Hopefully it will run again sometime.

The course is led by Dave Levin whose work with KIPP academies is mentioned in the book How Children Succeed. Other people I read about in that book, like Dr Angela Duckworth and Dominic Randolph, another educator like Dave Levin, are interviewed.

There are real case studies from real class rooms in action.

Researchers into relevant topics are also interviewed. These include:

As I’d read many things about the course content, including the above books, I found it even more interesting. Especially the explore section with additional resources.

Check this out. You’ll thank your self and your kids will thank you too.

All Circuits Are Busy – an artcle from nytimes.com

Source-psychcentraldotcom

“H. Sebastian Seung is a prophet of the connectome, the wiring diagram of the brain.” Thus begins a New York Times science article. “In a popular book, debates and public talks he has argued that in that wiring lies each person’s identity.”

You can read the full text at nytimes.com.

 

Do you judge a person by his questions or his answers?

This question was prompted by Voltaire’s “Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.”
But it was also prompted by the book I am reading just now, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas. Click on the link to read the FIRST LINES from the book to get an idea about its content.

Its an interesting book. And as expected prompting more questions than answers, and making me bold about asking ones of my own.

The author, Warren Berger quotes Joi Ito of MIT’s Media Lab saying “You don’t learn unless you question”.
And it matters how we question. We are likely to get different answers depending on whether we frame our questions as open ended ones or close ended ones.

Here’s some mind food on questions and questioning:

“Questions are infinitely superior to answers.”
~Dan Sullivan

* * *

“To get answers of life, ask questions”
~Sukant Ratnakar, Open the Windows

* * *

“Indeed, the only truly serious questions are ones that even a child can formulate. Only the most naive of questions are truly serious. They are the questions with no answers. A question with no answer is a barrier that cannot be breached. In other words, it is questions with no answers that set the limit of human possibilities, describe the boundaries of human existence.”
~Milan Kundera in The Unbearable Lightness of Being

* * *

“At the end of the day, the questions we ask of ourselves determine the type of people that we will become.”
~Leo Babauta

* * *

“Which would you rather be if you had the choice–divinely beautiful or dazzlingly clever or angelically good?”
~L.M. Montgomery in Anne of Green Gables

* * *

“The most important questions in life can never be answered by anyone except oneself.”
~John Fowles in The Magus

* * *

“To ask the ‘right’ question is far more important than to receive the answer. The solution of a problem lies in the understanding of the problem; the answer is not outside the problem, it is in the problem.”
~Jiddu Krishnamurti, The Flight of the Eagle

* * *

“An empowered life begins with serious personal questions about oneself. Those answers bare the seeds of success.”
~Steve Maraboli in Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience

* * *

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, he’s one who asks the right questions.”
~Claude Lévi-Strauss

* * *

“How many hours are there in a mile? Is yellow square or round?
Probably half the questions we ask-half our great theological and metaphysical problems-are like that.”
~C.S. Lewis

* * *

“No where in ‘humpty dumpty’ did it say he was an egg. Maybe your inability to think outside of what others have taught you is what’s keeping you from putting him together again.”
― Darnell Lamont Walker

Now ask yourself this: Why are questions infinitely better than answers? Why do questions feel like open doors while answers feel like closed ones?

Happy questioning!