Do you judge a person by his questions or his answers? [with video]

ask-blackboard-356079Isn’t that an interesting idea? I got the idea from Voltaire who said to:

Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.

Really the whole questions thing came to me because of the book I happened to be reading: A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas. It was all about questions and why questions are more important than answers.

This is the book trailer for Warren Berger’s book, A MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas. 

You can learn more about the book at http://amorebeautifulquestion.com.

Did you know that questions are more important than answers?

They are. Questions allow for inquiry, they are like open doors. Inviting you to come in. To seek. To experiment. To be curious.

Answers are more like closed doors. They stop you from going out or coming in. And they are metaphorically closures. They put an end to inquiry.

Which would you prefer? A question or an answer? Which would be more exciting? Producing questions or answers?

Okay, that is enough questions from me.

Here are some quotations on questions and questioning

* * *

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, he’s one who asks the right questions.”
~Claude Lévi-Strauss 

* * *

“Indeed, the only truly serious questions are ones that even a child can formulate. Only the most naïve of questions are truly serious. They are the questions with no answers. A question with no answer is a barrier that cannot be breached. In other words, it is questions with no answers that set the limit of human possibilities, describe the boundaries of human existence.”
~Milan Kundera in The Unbearable

* * *

“At the end of the day, the questions we ask of ourselves determine the type of people that we will become.”
~Leo Babauta

* * *

“Which would you rather be if you had the choice–divinely beautiful
or dazzlingly clever or angelically good?”
~L.M. Montgomery in Anne of Green Gables

* * *

“The most important questions in life can never be answered by anyone except oneself.”
~John Fowles in The Magus

* * *

“To ask the ‘right’ question is far more important than to receive the answer. The solution of a problem lies in the understanding of the problem; the answer is not outside the problem, it is in the problem.”
~Jiddu Krishnamurti in The Flight of the Eagle

* * *

“An empowered life begins with serious personal questions about oneself.
Those answers bare the seeds of success.”
~Steve Maraboli in
Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience

So what do you think? Share your thoughts with me.

Image by Pixabay via Pexels.

Saying No is not a one size fits all — Thriving Under Pressure

Do you have a difficult time saying no? While others in your life say no without a second thought. Is this confusing and at times upsetting for you? Are you hard on yourself because of this discrepancy between yourself and others? You may be interested to discover that Saying No is not a one size […]

via FEELERS VS. THINKERS Saying No is not a one size fits all — Thriving Under Pressure

Research on Happiness and Bad Decisions…. from Dan Gilbert

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Research shows that when we (humans) make decisions, we tend to focus on what we’re getting and forget about what we are forgoing.

I was just going to share this interesting article–Buried by bad decisions–by Dan Gilbert with you. But then I happened upon Dan Gilbert’s TED Talks:

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You can access them all at Dan Gilbert’s Ted page.

Enjoy the article. Its really interesting. Enjoy the talks, I am yet to complete all three. But I’ve watched the first one some time ago.

The Cycle of Life in English and Sinhala

Indian Weavers is a beautiful poem by Sarojini Naidu that makes you remember the endless cycle of life.

Watch Pandith Amaradeva singing the Sinhala version, Sannaliyane, in this youtube video.

This is one of the few instances in which I can enjoy both the English and Sinhala versions side by side and not feel cheated out of the original richness that may be lost in translation. The Sinhala version is as lovely as the English one here. I am not sure whether Naidu wrote the original in English.

As for the original poem, here it is:

 

WEAVERS, weaving at break of day,
Why do you weave a garment so gay? . . .
Blue as the wing of a halcyon wild,
We weave the robes of a new-born child.

Weavers, weaving at fall of night,
Why do you weave a garment so bright? . . .
Like the plumes of a peacock, purple and green,
We weave the marriage-veils of a queen.

 

Weavers, weaving solemn and still,
What do you weave in the moonlight chill? . . .
White as a feather and white as a cloud,
We weave a dead man’s funeral shroud.

Sarojini Naidu

I got the text from PoemHunter.com. You can read more of Sarojini Naidu poems at PoemHunter.com. There are at least 50 there.