Mindculture for Kids and Adults – New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults - My New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults – My New Facebook Page

Dear All, I started a new Facebook page, Mindculture for Kids and Adults.

Your mind is your greatest asset.
This page is dedicated to sharing info on the art and science of mind culture from cradle to grave.

If your focus in self improvement is business oriented, you may also want to visit my Business Trainer Sri Lanka Facebook page.

Please visit, like and follow. And share the good news with your friends and family.

Thanks

Nilooka

 

Research on Happiness and Bad Decisions…. from Dan Gilbert

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Research shows that when we (humans) make decisions, we tend to focus on what we’re getting and forget about what we are forgoing.

I was just going to share this interesting article–Buried by bad decisions–by Dan Gilbert with you. But then I happened upon Dan Gilbert’s TED Talks:

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You can access them all at Dan Gilbert’s Ted page.

Enjoy the article. Its really interesting. Enjoy the talks, I am yet to complete all three. But I’ve watched the first one some time ago.

A few thoughts on art…

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Amazing by Mel Bochner, 2011

Let’s put it this way. I am an art fanatic. This is mostly confined to looking, of course, and admiring others’ work. I actually spent my first three days in London inside the National Portrait Gallery (and almost got picked up by a charming old Scotsman) but I’ve not seen the usual London tourist spots like the Tower of London etc. Even my MBA thesis–which one would expect to be as far from art as possible–was based on the management issues of a Scottish art gallery.

I have eclectic tastes in art, as in the books I read. And I think that is great not to be able to be easily stereotyped. I really do not know much about art appreciation. Nor can I tell you much about art, artists, art history or different periods and styles. I just know what I like. Its all to do with emotions and little to do with anything else…

Sometimes I like things that just draw my eye. These are not the kind of things I’d go after, seeking out an exhibition or even visit a website for. But this piece, by Mel Bochner, which I saw in a NY Times slideshow really took my eye. So here I am sharing it with you.
It piqued my interest. This is why I visited the artist’s own website. That is even more interesting. Here are some visuals you will see… But I do recommend a visit, when you have a few minutes to spare.

Mindculture is about giving new experiences to our minds. And imagining what an artist was trying to convey, what was going though their mind, what made them come up with one piece or another is really something I enjoy. Giving flight to imagination is great for anyone’s mind.

Here’s an article from the New York Times about a current exhibition–Mel Bochner: Strong Language–at the Jewish Museum in New York.

Words have been the subjects and primary constituents of the enigmatic yet acerbically provocative paintings Mel Bochner has been creating over the past 12 years. “Mel Bochner: Strong Language,” an elegantly produced exhibition at the Jewish Museum, gives them their due and traces their roots back to text-based works that Mr. Bochner created in the ’60s and early ’70s, when he was one of New York’s pre-eminent Conceptual artists.

There is a great slideshow of a few works, including Amazing above.

Here are some other Mel Bochner works from different periods.

No, 2002

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Portrait of Robert Smithson, 1966

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Two Planar Arcs, 1977

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That is all for now. The artist’s website is really worth a visit.

Enjoy the visit!

And if you really enjoyed this feature, please let me know so I can do similar ones in the future.

Neuroscientists and psychologists find links between handwriting and learning (NYT article)

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Have you entirely given up on handwriting? Do you still believe it helps you organize your thoughts even if you work on a computer to put together a document? Well, you may be right.

Here’s what a New York Times science article, What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades, says:

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain.

“And it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn’t realize,” he continued. “Learning is made easier.”

You can read the complete article at the above link.

Here are a few more links you’d find interesting:

Please don’t let your kids give up on cursive altogether. And try writing something yourself, especially if it has to do with learning important things.

All Circuits Are Busy – an artcle from nytimes.com

Source-psychcentraldotcom

“H. Sebastian Seung is a prophet of the connectome, the wiring diagram of the brain.” Thus begins a New York Times science article. “In a popular book, debates and public talks he has argued that in that wiring lies each person’s identity.”

You can read the full text at nytimes.com.

 

Close down the R&D Division

You don’t think its a good idea? Okay. Remember this then:

“Children are the research and development division of the human species”
~Psychologist Alison Gopnik

Don’t send your kids to a preschool where teaching is the priority.

Kids should be allowed to explore and experiment and ask questions in preschool, not burdened with instruction. teaching things too early is harmful for their natural development and future progress.

Just like closing down the R&D division. Only short-sighted companies do that, right?

This move towards teaching too early comes from two things: Parental pressure (why aren’t they teaching my kids stuff?) and government policy towards more structured instruction.

In Sri Lanka, where the government schools do not expect kids to enter grade one knowing their alphabet and counting, too much teaching comes from over zealous parents demanding preschools to teach stuff… and preschools who actually listen to the parents and their ignorant requests.

Taking The Long View

From “Food for Thought” By Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo (Phra Suddhidhammaransi Gambhiramedhacariya) translated from the Thai byThanissaro Bhikkhu

August 4, 1957

Most of us tend to concern ourselves only with short, small, and narrow things. For instance, we think that there isn’t much to human life — we’re born and then we die — so we pay attention only to our stomachs and appetites. There’s hardly anyone who thinks further than that, who thinks out past death. This is why we’re short-sighted and don’t think of developing any goodness or virtues within ourselves, because we don’t see the truth and the extremely important benefits we’ll gain from these things in the future.

 

Actually, the affairs of each person are really long and drawn out, and not at all short. If they were short, we’d all know where we came from and how we got where we are. The same would hold true for the future: If our affairs were really a short story, we’d know where we’re going and what we’ll be after death.

You can read the rest of Taking the Long View at accesstoinsight.org.