Mindculture for Kids and Adults – New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults - My New Facebook Page

Mindculture for Kids and Adults – My New Facebook Page

Dear All, I started a new Facebook page, Mindculture for Kids and Adults.

Your mind is your greatest asset.
This page is dedicated to sharing info on the art and science of mind culture from cradle to grave.

If your focus in self improvement is business oriented, you may also want to visit my Business Trainer Sri Lanka Facebook page.

Please visit, like and follow. And share the good news with your friends and family.

Thanks

Nilooka

 

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Research on Happiness and Bad Decisions…. from Dan Gilbert

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Research shows that when we (humans) make decisions, we tend to focus on what we’re getting and forget about what we are forgoing.

I was just going to share this interesting article–Buried by bad decisions–by Dan Gilbert with you. But then I happened upon Dan Gilbert’s TED Talks:

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You can access them all at Dan Gilbert’s Ted page.

Enjoy the article. Its really interesting. Enjoy the talks, I am yet to complete all three. But I’ve watched the first one some time ago.

Frustrated?

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I think that is often the case that we are accomplices in our own frustrations. You need proof? You get it from Google, where else!’

According to Google statistics, people search the word “money” four times as often as the word “goal”. This creates a word: “frustration”.
~Tim Fargo, Alphabet Success – Keeping it

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And its not really nice where frustrations can take us. Here’s Lemony Snicket in The Wide Window:

Frustration is an interesting emotional state, because it tends to bring out the worst in whoever is frustrated. Frustrated babies tend to throw food and make a mess. Frustrated citizens tend to execute kings and queens and make a democracy. And frustrated moths tend to bang up against lightbulbs and make light fixtures all dusty.”

People cry, laugh, scream, commit murder and even suicide out of frustration. Here are a few quotations about frustration, its causes and how to deal with it.

 “Forget perfect on the first try. In the face of frustration, your best tool is a few deep breaths, and remembering that you can do anything once you’ve practed two hundred times.”
~Miriam Peskowitz, The Daring Book for Girls

* * *

“The path of my life is strewn with cow pats from the devil’s own satanic herd!”
~Rowan Atkinson, Blackadder II: Complete Series

* * *

“Our frustration is greater when we have much and want more than when we have nothing and want some. We are less dissatisfied when we lack many things than when we seem to lack but one thing.”
~Eric Hoffer

* * *

“Were you born this infuriating?”
“It’s taken me years of practice.”
~Misty Massey, Mad Kestrel

* * *

“Am I ever angry or frustrated? I only feel angry sometimes when I see waste, when things that we waste are what people need, things that would save them from dying. Frustrated? No, never.”
~Mother Teresa, The Joy in Loving: A Guide to Daily Living
* * *

And people have different ways of dealing with it.

“Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion. I myself prefer to laugh, since there is less cleaning do to do afterward.”
~Kurt Vonnegut

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“To conquer frustration, one must remain intensely focused on the outcome, not the obstacles.”
~T.F. Hodge, From Within I Rise

 

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So the next  time you are feeling frustrated remember this:

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When somone is upset, your initial response matters

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A women under stress is not immediately concerned with finding solutions to her problems but rather seeks relief by expressing herself and being understood.~John Gray

And not just women, this applies to everyone. I read in The Happiest Toddler on the Block how it applies to kids and adults alike.

When somene is upset, they go ‘ape’ and their brains revert back to relying on primitive brain responses. This is the natural human response to stress. Logic does not work then. The kindest thing to do is to show sympathy in a way that your friend (or child or whoever is upset) cool down, by showing you care, that you understand.

So when a friend or your partner says “My boss is terrible. Illogical, I’ve had enough, I wish I could leave this job!” or something similar about any aspect of life, don’t reciprocate with “Yes I’ve had a bad day at work also. We should both look for jobs.” That makes you come out as insensitive. Lacking understanding. In toddlers it makes their moods worse.

Instead sympathize with a phrase like, “I know, it must be so difficult for you…” Afterwards when the upset person cools down, you can talk about things, with a clearer perspective.

I leave you with a quote by Mister Rogers:

In times of stress, the best thing we can do for each other is to listen with our ears and our hearts and to be assured that our questions are just as important as our answers.
~Fred Rogers in The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember

Read Stress, Don’t Let it Overpower You, a collection of inspirational stress quotations in my other blog.

 

Why is the sky blue?

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I got into this while reading a book. Figured I’ll have to explain this one pretty soon, so thought I might as well be prepared. the book, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas, provides an explanation. Here’s my version of it.

Science of why the sky is blue:

a) White light we see is composed of various colours. refraction experiments. Think prisms and rainbows.

b) But why blue and not other colours? Why does more blue light get refracted into our eyes than other colours?
Blue light scatters more due to gas molecules in the air.

c) Our eyes are also more sensitive to blue…

So the next time your child asks you why the sky is blue, now you know.

Good luck figuring out how to say this simply…

 

 

Stone walls do not a prison make…

Here’s the final stanza from To Althea, from Prison by Richard Lovelace.

I’m not even giving a source because I know this bit by heart (but not so much the complete poem).

Stone Walls do not a Prison make,
   Nor Iron bars a Cage;
Minds innocent and quiet take
   That for an Hermitage.
If I have freedom in my Love,
   And in my soul am free,
Angels alone that soar above,
   Enjoy such Liberty.
 
I just love this, taking it literally, even though I don’t believe in angels…
So, do stone walls a prison make? What do you think?
 
If you want to read to whole poem and a detailed analysis about it, I found that The Guardian had covered it as their Poem of the Week back in September 2013.
 
 

Taking The Long View

From “Food for Thought” By Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo (Phra Suddhidhammaransi Gambhiramedhacariya) translated from the Thai byThanissaro Bhikkhu

August 4, 1957

Most of us tend to concern ourselves only with short, small, and narrow things. For instance, we think that there isn’t much to human life — we’re born and then we die — so we pay attention only to our stomachs and appetites. There’s hardly anyone who thinks further than that, who thinks out past death. This is why we’re short-sighted and don’t think of developing any goodness or virtues within ourselves, because we don’t see the truth and the extremely important benefits we’ll gain from these things in the future.

 

Actually, the affairs of each person are really long and drawn out, and not at all short. If they were short, we’d all know where we came from and how we got where we are. The same would hold true for the future: If our affairs were really a short story, we’d know where we’re going and what we’ll be after death.

You can read the rest of Taking the Long View at accesstoinsight.org.